Friends teach each other through study and fellowship

Caleb and Laura Benningfield have learned so much from their friendship with their Karen friends.

“I guess I’ve just had a change of perspective,” said Laura Benningfield. “I feel like I’ve gotten a lot more out of them than they’ve gotten out of me.”

“It’s given me a lot of perspective on how blessed I am to be in the position I’m in,” said Caleb Benningfield. “Growing up the way we grew up is a blessing in itself.”

Their friendship is an example of the good that can happen when people of different backgrounds teach each other. In the time they’ve known each other, the Benningfields have noticed changes for the better in the lives of their refugee friends, especially the women.

“I see a willingness to try new things, a willingness to speak out,” said Laura Benningfield. “Whereas before, some of the women may have been too timid to do any of those things.”

However, life for their friends Po Po, Po Khu and Ka Tay wasn’t always so certain.

“Some of them still have family back in the refugee camps,” said Caleb Benningfield.

Po Khu spoke about his life in the refugee camps of Thailand, which currently host 84,900 registered refugees, and the food shortages he had to deal with among other problems.

One of Laura’s greatest joys is sharing simple western customs like baby showers, trick or treating, birthdays or even just baking cookies.

“It’s just a simple pleasure of life that they’ve never had,” said Laura.

As for the future, the Benningfield’s plans center on continuing to learn English, nutrition, citizenship and teaching their friends to drive. They have also expressed interest in finding a preacher that speaks the same language as their friends. Primarily though, their goals are aimed at helping them assimilate into American culture, Caleb Benningfield said.

Locals reach out to refugees by forming friendships

Caleb Benningfield helps Po Khu, a Burmese refugee, during a Bible lesson on Saturday Nov. 2. Benningfield has been visiting refugees in their apartments on Lovers Lane for three months, although he and his wife Laura have been friends with them much longer. "Its helped me be more appreciative of everything we have in America," said Benningfield.

Caleb Benningfield helps Po Khu, a Burmese refugee, during a Bible lesson on Saturday Nov. 2. Benningfield has been visiting refugees in their apartments on Lovers Lane for three months, although he and his wife Laura have been friends with them much longer.

“I learned a lot about their story, about how they got here,” said Caleb Benningfield.

Caleb and Laura Benningfield, members of Living Hope Baptist Church have been helping a group of Burmese refugees in any way they can, primarily through their Bible and English lessons on weekends.

“Its helped me be more appreciative of everything we have in America,” said Caleb Benningfield.

Benningfield has been doing these lessons for three months, and his wife, Laura Benningfield, has been working with them for a year.

While the small group of Burmese refugees is Christian, they have difficulties participating in conventional Sunday services due to language barriers.

The students, who are adults in their twenties, include Po Po, Po Khu, his wife Ka Tay and other students. Po Po speaks English quite well and is able to explain vocabulary words to her friends. Po Khu may be an aspiring pastor for his people, and Ka Tay is trying to get her driver’s license. All the students listened intently to the lesson, which covered Bible stories like the baptism of Jesus by John the Baptist.

Christianity is practiced by 4 percent of the population in Burma, and is said to face persecution by the more powerful majorities in the country.

The lesson concluded with a prayer beseeching God for protection of one of the students, who is pregnant and expecting a child soon. Benningfield also asked for the strength to finish a marathon that he would be participating in the following day.

“It’s just been a fun way to develop a friendship with them,” said Benningfield.