Friends teach each other through study and fellowship

Caleb and Laura Benningfield have learned so much from their friendship with their Karen friends.

“I guess I’ve just had a change of perspective,” said Laura Benningfield. “I feel like I’ve gotten a lot more out of them than they’ve gotten out of me.”

“It’s given me a lot of perspective on how blessed I am to be in the position I’m in,” said Caleb Benningfield. “Growing up the way we grew up is a blessing in itself.”

Their friendship is an example of the good that can happen when people of different backgrounds teach each other. In the time they’ve known each other, the Benningfields have noticed changes for the better in the lives of their refugee friends, especially the women.

“I see a willingness to try new things, a willingness to speak out,” said Laura Benningfield. “Whereas before, some of the women may have been too timid to do any of those things.”

However, life for their friends Po Po, Po Khu and Ka Tay wasn’t always so certain.

“Some of them still have family back in the refugee camps,” said Caleb Benningfield.

Po Khu spoke about his life in the refugee camps of Thailand, which currently host 84,900 registered refugees, and the food shortages he had to deal with among other problems.

One of Laura’s greatest joys is sharing simple western customs like baby showers, trick or treating, birthdays or even just baking cookies.

“It’s just a simple pleasure of life that they’ve never had,” said Laura.

As for the future, the Benningfield’s plans center on continuing to learn English, nutrition, citizenship and teaching their friends to drive. They have also expressed interest in finding a preacher that speaks the same language as their friends. Primarily though, their goals are aimed at helping them assimilate into American culture, Caleb Benningfield said.

Bowling Green Burmese Refugees Support each Other

This week I spoke with Vung Dim of the Bowing Green International Center. My interview with Dim focused on gaining more information about why Burmese refugees particularly settle in Bowling Green, and why they choose to live in the Lover’s Lane apartment complex. I also gained some insight into how diverse language is within Burma, as not everyone from Burma speaks Burmese.

When she lived in Texas, Dim volunteered as a translator and interpreter for people from Burma. She decided she wanted to go into this as a job.

Currently at her job at the Bowling Green International Center, Dim works as a scheduler while helping out with translation and interpreting as needed.

One thing that Dim wanted to get across in our discussion was that not everyone from Burma speaks the same language.

“Not everyone speak Burmese,” said Dim. “They have their own language and dialect.”

Burma is very diverse in terms of the languages people speak. One of the things Dim does is decide which language someone speaks based on their name. “I am Zo,” said Dim. “I belong to Chin.” Zomi is a language within Chin, which is a group of people who live within Burma.

Burma gained its named from the Burmese who make up the majority in Burma. Although many minorities live within Burma the name stuck over time.

“We cannot just change,” said Dim. “We cannot change it easily.”

When I asked Dim about why Burmese refugees choose to settle in the Lover’s Lane apartments she had the following to say.

Burmese refugees, just like everyone else, seek out people like them, because community is so important in our lives.